Managing for Autonomy

If we want engagement, and the mediocrity busting results it produces, we have to make sure people have autonomy over the four most important aspects of their work:
  1. Task – What they do
  2. Time – When they do it
  3. Technique – How they do it
  4. Team – Whom they do it with.
After a decade of truly spectacular underachievement, what we need now is less management and more freedom – fewer individual automatons and more autonomous individuals.
Daniel H. Pink
Want to learn how to manage for autonomy?  Get in touch.

Are You This Innovative?

Do you need to be?

Autonomy, Mastery and Purpose – the PMN Way

This TED video by Dan Pink provides some lovely support for the PMN approach to management.  18 minutes or so.

Better Mentoring

Thinking of setting up a mentoring scheme?  Here are some top tips to improve the chances of success:

  1. Educate mentees in how to choose and use a mentor – this will provide a better return on investment than training people in how to be good mentors
  2. Offer a mentor matching service – but always encourage people to look for their own mentors first – this ensures relevance
  3. Always encourage people to check out a few potential mentors rather than allocating them one
  4. Train people who have already been approached to become mentors – avoid training a whole bunch of people who want to mentor, but for whom there is no demand

Please do add more….

Progress School in Leeds

Looking to broaden and deepen your personal and professional development?

Live and or work in Leeds?

Check out Progress School

Not in Leeds but like the idea of a Progress School on your turf?

Get in touch!

PMN on Twitter

I have just set up a dedicated twitter account for PMN.  You can now follow me on twitter @PMNUK.

Check out the twitter stream at http://twitter.com/pmnuk

This account will be used to provide regular ideas, inspiration, reminders and nudges about effective progressive management.

I also tweet on @mikechitty – where the focus is more on my work in enteprise and education.

Hope this makes things better for you!

Mike Chity

Focussing On Deviance and Missing Beauty

I often meet managers who are obsessed with plans and performance.  As a result they tend to focus on deviance.  Things that go wrong, that don’t meet the plan.

As a result they find it hard to see and acknowledge the good stuff.  The vast majority of their feedback is about problems and they fail to acknowledge or even see the good work that is done every day.

If you need convincing that you only see what you are looking for try this video for size.

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Conducting and Leadership

Find yourself half an hour and wathc ths wonderful video to learn about leadership from conductor Itay Talgam.

Looks at various conducting styles and teaches profoundly while entertaining!

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A Rare Piece

Simon Caulkin’s Management Column in the Observer is a victim of the recession.

Read his last piece here.

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Passion Depletion?

We all have days, sometimes weeks, months even years when our enthusiasm and love for life is not as high as we want it to be. Don’t we?

We all suffer bouts of ‘passion depletion’.

In my world ‘passion’ is not just about enthusiasm, love and enjoyment.  It is also a measure of suffering – as in ‘the passion of Christ’.

It is a measure of how much suffering we are prepared to put up with to pursue that which we love.  It is linked to the question ‘Are you willing to pay the price for the success that you desire?’  What will you put up with, put at risk in order to pursue your dream?  How many hours of practice, research, writing, planning and thinking?

In this formulation ‘passion depletion’ (now meaning a reduction in the amount of suffering you are prepared to put up with in order to pursue your goals) is a sign that you are falling out of love with your original goal.  Perhaps there is something else that you would rather suffer for?

It maybe a very positive sign that ‘new doors’ are opening.

I know that this formulation about suffering is not popular, but for me it does reflect more of the truth of day to day life and professional and private practice.  It provides me with a useful benchmark against which to gauge my life choices.

When some of your team seem to have ‘passion depletion’  it might be telling you, and them, something important.

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